Biology Degree

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ASCB is an inclusive, international community of biologists studying the cell, the fundamental unit of life. That’s why each year, our professors welcome students into their labs or into the field, working side-by-side on original research, asking questions that no one has answered and looking for solutions that are yet to be discovered. We explore a wide range of fundamental biological questions with a focus on molecular cell biology at all levels, from molecular structure to human disease. On this module you’ll attend lectures, practical classes, workshops and supervised time in a studio or workshops, and you’ll take part in fieldwork study and external visits.

All of these tools for state-of-the-art molecular and integrative biology research — as well as opportunities to do field research on our University farm and in the lush environment around campus — will be available to you as an undergraduate student. Biologists study the structure, function, growth, origin, evolution and distribution of living organisms. As a biology major, you might accompany your professors on a field expedition to study seabirds in Alaska, wild eggplants in Australia, giant salamanders in Japan, or bats, bees, and lightning bugs here in Pennsylvania.

It began to dominate the study of evolution, posing a series of challenges to the synthetic theory of evolution, and culminating with the views of Japanese geneticist Motoo Kimura (1924-94) and others who argued that the vast majority of variation seen at the molecular level was due to random genetic drift and mutation and not to natural selection, which acted merely in a negative or eliminative role.

In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops, guided independent study sessions and fieldwork for about 14 hours a week. Kevin Dunbar and his students spent many hours meticulously interviewing real biologists from top laboratories, recording their lab meetings, and reading grant applications and manuscripts of research papers. On this module you’ll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops, and supervised time in a studio or workshops and you’ll take part in fieldwork study and guided independent study.

Biology is one of the largest majors at Dickinson, home to 14 faculty members with research expertise in ecology, molecular genetics, cell biology, plant biology, animal physiology, microbiology, neuroscience, bioinformatics and evolution. The survival of a living organism depends on the continuous input of energy Chemical reactions that are responsible for its structure and function are tuned to extract energy from substances that act as its food and transform them to help form new cells and sustain them.

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